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Screens

Screen (Kwakshua Channel, EJTA_4)

2015, 48 x 32 inches, inkjet and green screen acrylic on canvas

The central painted area is "chroma key" or "green screen" green, commonly used on film and video sets so that different scenery or props can be digitally composited during post production. Despite the green's vibrant appearance, its ultimate function is invisibility. The two figures hunched over the screen are archaeologists working on the coast of BC at an ancient village site and midden. The site has no known name other than its archaeological designation of EJTA4. It is located on the Kwakshua Channel near the Hakai Institute on Calvert Island. They are scanning for artifacts using a framed wire mesh screen, washing out buckets of soil excavated from the adjacent midden. At the time this photo was taken, they estimated the site would date back more than 10,000 years, shortly after the last ice age when some of the first people began arriving on the continent.

From: Screens

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Screen (Kwakshua Channel, EJTA_4)

2015, 48 x 32 inches, inkjet and green screen acrylic on canvas

The central painted area is "chroma key" or "green screen" green, commonly used on film and video sets so that different scenery or props can be digitally composited during post production. Despite the green's vibrant appearance, its ultimate function is invisibility. The two figures hunched over the screen are archaeologists working on the coast of BC at an ancient village site and midden. The site has no known name other than its archaeological designation of EJTA4. It is located on the Kwakshua Channel near the Hakai Institute on Calvert Island. They are scanning for artifacts using a framed wire mesh screen, washing out buckets of soil excavated from the adjacent midden. At the time this photo was taken, they estimated the site would date back more than 10,000 years, shortly after the last ice age when some of the first people began arriving on the continent.

From: Screens

[2 of 5]